Elizabeth Nonweiler

Elizabeth Nonweiler

Elizabeth Nonweiler is an experienced teacher who provides training in synthetic phonics for beginning readers. As a committee member of the Reading Reform Foundation she advises the UK government about the curriculum and assessment of children’s phonics skills. She offers training in the use of synthetic phonics, as well as an overview of a range of effective resources for consolidation, progression and special needs. In the UK, Elizabeth has provided training to over 150 schools, as well as local authorities on the teaching of reading. Internationally, Elizabeth was a member of the critique team for the new Nigerian English Studies Curriculum developed by the Nigeria Educational Research and Development Council of Nigeria. She has also provided training for schools in Uganda, Kenya, Morocco, Slovakia, France, Spain, Holland, Carriacou, Petite Martinique, Cayman Islands and Germany. Elizabeth offers training and consultancy through her organisation ‘Teach to Read’ teachtoread.com.

Judy West

Judy West

Judy gained her teaching qualification at Cambridge University. After that she taught English in Sweden and Bahrain before completing her MA in English for Speakers of Other Languages at the London Institute of Education. She has since co-authored a number of books for Macmillan publishing including a major course for children, Bravo. For many years she was a Senior Lecturer for Teacher Training in a London College, whilst also visiting many countries for training and research. She is currently a freelance author, teacher and trainer. She has a special interest in literacy development in Primary age learners and has written three children’s picture books.

Publications include:
Hello English for Egypt
(levels 123, 456) Balberry Publishing; Super Starters, Delta Publishing; Sunrise English for Kurdistan, Macmillan Education; English for Palestine, Macmillan Education; Smart Beginner International, English for Teenagers, Macmillan Education;

Dr. Pauline Dixon

Dr. Pauline Dixon

Dr. Pauline Dixon is a senior lecturer in International Development and Education at Newcastle University in the North East of England and has extensive experience working in Asia and Africa. Her major research interests are the theory of Austrian Economics, education vouchers in developing countries, children’s literacy and the regulation and privatisation of education in developing countries. In conjunction with her work in Africa, she was also the lead advisor and education consultant for the British based charity Absolute Return for Kids (ARK), where she helped initiate the ASPIRE programme (Allow Synthetic Phonics to Improve Results in English). The work has allowed children from the slums of Shahdara, East Delhi to improve their reading and spelling skills, thus highlighting the importance of generating phonemic awareness amongst second language learners and creative pedagogies that move away from rote learning methods, typically found throughout India.

Pauline has been working recently on the following projects:
John Templeton Foundation research – Education in Difficult Places 2011-2013; UBS AG – Extending Access to Quality Education for the Underserved 2011-2013; DfID – Lagos State Household Poverty and School Choice Research Study 2012

Susan Lloyd – MBE

Susan Lloyd – MBE

Qualifying as a teacher in 1964 Susan originally taught using the ‘look and say’ method with her primary school pupils. Her head of department changed the method to ‘synthetic phonics’ and the school noticed a vast improvement in reading and spelling with all children achieving average or above average ability.

In 1990 Susan met Chris Jolly the founder of Jolly Learning, who was also interested in the structure of English language and how the alphabetic code worked. As a small independent publisher the two worked together to produce ‘The Phonics Handbook’ in order to share Susan’s teaching methods. Retiring from teaching in 2003 Susan concentrated on Phonics training and has since trained teachers in 29 different countries. Susan is driven to support the learning of the 20% of children who find learning to read and write very difficult. These children can be supported and achieve results if they are taught with the synthetic phonics method and decodable readers. Susan’s passion for the teaching method has recently led her to be awarded the MBE for introducing synthetic phonics which has now been made government policy in the UK.

More recently Susan is devoting her time to create a synthetic phonics website to explain what should be taught and why some children struggle and how to support them.